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The Cost of Cybercrime Increases by 36.5% Since 2016

According to Symantec’s 2017 Norton Cyber Security Insights Report, globally in 2017 victims lost a total of $172 billion due to cybercrimes. Out of that $172 billion, American consumers lost $19.4 billion alone. In reading through the reports, it seems like overconfidence is the top issue when it comes to consumers protecting themselves against cybercriminals. In the age of thumb print and facial recognition, it can be easy to forget the basics when it comes to protecting ourselves. Simple steps such as not sharing passwords, not using duplicate passwords across accounts, changing passwords periodically or writing passwords down on paper are still being over looked. Consumers still fail at making sure they have an anti-virus installed on their devices, along with keeping that anti-virus up to date.  Suspicious email scams are also still very much alive and well.  Consumers still open emails from unknown senders, and download files from suspicious emails.  These are all very basic steps that in 2018, should be common knowledge amongst technology users, but we tend to forget because we over-confidently think that “nothing will happen to me”. Cybercrimes not only affect consumers on a personal level, but if you run a business “in the cloud”, they can affect the core of your business as well. Business owners really need to consider the security risks involved in cloud computing. The New York Times released an article discussing two major flaws inside nearly all of the world’s computers, this includes the computers used by your cloud based storage system. One flaw called Meltdown, allows hackers to use their rented cloud space to obtain other consumers information...